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City’s Outside Water Use Program

City’s Outside Water Use Now Level 0 Blue

Outside Water Use Back in the Blue

Update: August 2, 2023 – The outside water use program is moving back to blue from yellow. In level yellow blue, lawn watering is restricted to 7-9 a.m. and 7-9 p.m. on odd or even calendar dates by address number—odd-numbered houses (house numbers ending in a 1, 3, 5, 7, or 9) can water on odd-numbered calendar dates, and even-numbered houses (ending in a 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8) on even dates. Outdoor water uses such as watering trees and flowers or food gardens, and running sprinklers for children’s recreational use are allowed at anytime. Any use of a garden or outdoor hose around the yard must use a shut–off nozzle. Wasting water is not permitted at any time.

In level 1 yellow, the City takes an education-first approach to outside water use program enforcement. Bylaw officers will share information and may issue a fine or court summons for repeated observed infraction.

Original Media Release

Guelph, Ont., June 7, 2023 – In response to recent hot, dry weather, the City is changing watering restrictions from level 0 blue to level 1 yellow of the Outside Water Use Program.

At level 1 yellow, lawn watering is restricted to 7-9 a.m. and 7-9 p.m. on odd or even calendar dates by address number—odd numbered houses can water on odd numbered dates, and even numbered houses on even dates.

In addition to rainfall and dry conditions, other indicators that change local watering restrictions include local river flows, how much water the community is using and how much the City is producing or pumping through the system. The City will continue to monitor conditions and work with the Grand River Conservation Authority throughout the summer to decide if water use levels need to change again, up or down.

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Outdoor water uses such as watering trees and flowers or food gardens, and running sprinklers for children’s recreational use are still allowed. Any use of a garden or outdoor hose around the yard must use a shut–off nozzle. Wasting water is not permitted at any time.

Guelph is a groundwater community. Groundwater comes from rain and melted snow that seeps into open spaces and cracks in soil and rock. As temperatures rise and we experience low precipitation, our water supply infrastructure needs to work harder to keep up with demands, especially during peak water use times. Guelph’s water supply is limited and is greatly dependent on local precipitation, which is why the City promotes responsible and efficient outdoor and indoor water use at all times.

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